BHI applies a range of tools and methods to collect, analyze, and disseminate health-related data. This can include electronic health records, health information exchanges, clinical decision support systems, and telehealth technologies.

Through engaging with Health IT policy and government regulations, the BHHD Lab seeks to illuminate the structural and systemic factors in health information technology (Health IT) that contribute to health disparities in the Black community.

By leveraging these tools, BHI seeks to improve the quality, safety, and effectiveness of healthcare delivery, as well as support patient-centered care and disease prevention.

Black Health Informatics 

Black health informatics (BHI) is an emerging field that sits at the intersection of Black Studies, health information technology and data analysis to advance health equity.

The field aims to improve health outcomes and reduce health inequities by developing and implementing informatics solutions that are culturally relevant, community-centered, and inclusive of Black perspectives and experiences.

Black Health Informatics 

Black health informatics (BHI) is an emerging field that sits at the intersection of Black Studies, health information technology and data analysis to advance health equity.

The field aims to improve health outcomes and reduce health inequities by developing and implementing informatics solutions that are culturally relevant, community-centered, and inclusive of Black perspectives and experiences.

BHI applies a range of tools and methods to collect, analyze, and disseminate health-related data. This can include electronic health records, health information exchanges, clinical decision support systems, and telehealth technologies.

Through engaging with Health IT policy and government regulations, the BHHD Lab seeks to illuminate the structural and systemic factors in health information technology (Health IT) that contribute to health disparities in the Black community.

By leveraging these tools, BHI seeks to improve the quality, safety, and effectiveness of healthcare delivery, as well as support patient-centered care and disease prevention.

Black Health Informatics 

Black health informatics (BHI) is an emerging field that sits at the intersection of Black Studies, health information technology and data analysis to advance health equity.

The field aims to improve health outcomes and reduce health inequities by developing and implementing informatics solutions that are culturally relevant, community-centered, and inclusive of Black perspectives and experiences.

BHI applies a range of tools and methods to collect, analyze, and disseminate health-related data. This can include electronic health records, health information exchanges, clinical decision support systems, and telehealth technologies.

Through engaging with Health IT policy and government regulations, the BHHD Lab seeks to illuminate the structural and systemic factors in health information technology (Health IT) that contribute to health disparities in the Black community.

By leveraging these tools, BHI seeks to improve the quality, safety, and effectiveness of healthcare delivery, as well as support patient-centered care and disease prevention.

Black Health Informatics Working Group

We are an inter-institutional and interdisciplinary group of researchers with expertise in health informatics, race, health IT legislation and policy.

Dr. Kadija Ferryman

Dr. Ferryman is currently core faculty at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics and Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University.

Dr. Karmen Williams

Dr. Williams is an Assistant Professor in the Population Health Informatics program and Health Policy and Management at the City University of New York Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy.

Dr. Melissa Creary

Melissa Creary, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Management and Policy in the School of Public Health. 

Dr. Terika McCall

Dr. McCall is an Assistant Professor in the Biostatistics Department (Health Informatics Division) at the Yale School of Public Health, and Director of the Consumer Health Informatics Lab (CHIL) at Yale. 

Ms. Odia Kane

Odia Kane (she/her) is a doctoral student studying Health Policy and Management with a concentration in Bioethics and Health Policy at Johns Hopkins University.

Dr. Charles Senteio

Dr. Senteio is a health informatics researcher and an Associate Professor at the Rutgers School of Communication and Information in the Department of Library and Information Science.

Dr. Kevin Wiley, Jr.

Kevin Wiley, Jr. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Healthcare Leadership and Management at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC).

Dr. Megan Threats

Dr. Megan Threats is an Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan School of Information. She is also Visiting Research Faculty at the Yale School of Public Health.

Dr. Amelia Gibson

Dr. Gibson is an Associate Professor and director of the Community Equity Data & Information Lab at the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Dr. Judy W. Gichoya

Dr. Gichoya is an assistant professor at Emory university in Interventional Radiology and Informatics. 

Ms. Hope Gracie Gray

Hope G. Gray, MTS, RBC, is a PhD student in Administration-Health Services with a concentration in Health Informatics at the University of Alabama, Birmingham.

Dr. Kim Gallon

Dr. Gallon is an Associate Professor of Africana Studies at Brown University as well as the Director and Founder of the Black Health Heritage Data Lab.

Dr. Kadija Ferryman

Dr. Ferryman is currently core faculty at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics and Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University.

Dr. Karmen Williams

Dr. Williams is an Assistant Professor in the Population Health Informatics program and Health Policy and Management at the City University of New York Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy.

Dr. Melissa Creary

Melissa Creary, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Management and Policy in the School of Public Health. 

Dr. Terika McCall

Dr. McCall is an Assistant Professor in the Biostatistics Department (Health Informatics Division) at the Yale School of Public Health, and Director of the Consumer Health Informatics Lab (CHIL) at Yale. 

Ms. Odia Kane

Odia Kane (she/her) is a doctoral student studying Health Policy and Management with a concentration in Bioethics and Health Policy at Johns Hopkins University.

Dr. Charles Senteio

Dr. Senteio is a health informatics researcher and an Associate Professor at the Rutgers School of Communication and Information in the Department of Library and Information Science.

Dr. Kevin Wiley, Jr.

Kevin Wiley, Jr. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Healthcare Leadership and Management at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC).

Dr. Megan Threats

Dr. Megan Threats is an Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan School of Information. She is also Visiting Research Faculty at the Yale School of Public Health.

Dr. Amelia Gibson

Dr. Gibson is an Associate Professor and director of the Community Equity Data & Information Lab at the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Dr. Judy W. Gichoya

Dr. Gichoya is an assistant professor at Emory university in Interventional Radiology and Informatics. 

Dr. Kim Gallon

Dr. Gallon is an Associate Professor of Africana Studies at Brown University as well as the Director and Founder of the Black Health Heritage Data Lab.

Ms. Hope Gracie Gray

Hope G. Gray, MTS, RBC, is a PhD student in Administration-Health Services with a concentration in Health Informatics at the University of Alabama, Birmingham.

The Digital Backdoor

The Black Health Informatics working group examines and responds to health information technology policy and considers its implications for health equity.

This work also addresses “digital back doors,” which are technological processes and tools used in health care, such as racially biased algorithms, infrastructural limitations, and dirty data. that can exacerbate existing health inequities

The Digital Backdoor

The Black Health Informatics working group examines and responds to health information technology policy and considers its implications for health equity.

This work also addresses “digital back doors,” which are technological processes and tools used in health care, such as racially biased algorithms, infrastructural limitations, and dirty data. that can exacerbate existing health inequities